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  RANK # PoS   WORD SPOK FIC MAG NEWS ACAD
1 1000  V    SIGN 42998 9304 5127 8676 15164 4727
2 1001  P    SOMEBODY 45040 24891 9793 4091 5421 844
3 1002  N    MAGAZINE 42662 9965 5545 12510 10122 4520
4 1003  N    HOTEL 43118 5756 9508 10616 14882 2356
5 1004  N    SOLDIER 43641 10619 8855 8084 10333 5750
6 1005  V    REFLECT 43769 3674 3622 8254 6585 21634
7 1006  J    HEAVY 42212 4885 13393 11607 7228 5099
8 1007  J    SEXUAL 44480 7337 2420 7982 5909 20832
9 1008  N    CAUSE 41671 10286 4925 8706 6244 11510
10 1009  N    BAG 43693 4881 17502 12258 6734 2318
 

it was nothing unusual. For years, layers of television history have been waiting to be unearthed: recordings of vintage shows, hundreds of which have fallen out of sight. Some have easily been found; some have been entombed in the most unlikely places. Others might never be retrieved. Show-biz archaeologists have gone from coast to coast to uncover lost shows: to the basement of a dentist's house in Alexandria, Va.; to a condemned watch-company building in Illinois; to a garage sale in Westchester County; to Dumpsters outside TV stations across the country. Their efforts don't get much attention, especially compared with high-profile, well-funded campaigns to preserve films, championed by the likes of Jodie Foster and Martin Scorsese. But, according to archivists, TV preservation is just as urgent. Patrick Loughney, head of the moving image section of the Library of Congress, cited an alarming conclusion reached by his institution's 1997 study of TV

 
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[NEWSPAPER] New York Times (2001)
 



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